What can we celebrate today?

Discussion about miscellaneous topics not covered by other forums
AAAlphaThunder
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Re: What can we celebrate today?

Post by AAAlphaThunder » Sat Aug 01, 2020 2:22 pm

[2016] The Yorkshire Dales National Park was extended by nearly a quarter (161 square miles were added), covering new areas in Cumbria and into Lancashire.

It's beautiful, an ideal staycation.
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Re: What can we celebrate today?

Post by blythburgh » Sun Aug 02, 2020 7:26 am

AAAlphaThunder wrote:
Sat Aug 01, 2020 2:22 pm
[2016] The Yorkshire Dales National Park was extended by nearly a quarter (161 square miles were added), covering new areas in Cumbria and into Lancashire.

It's beautiful, an ideal staycation.
Absolutely but does the National Park need a new name? The Lake District can be so popular but the Yorkshire Dales are less popular but stunning. As is the Peak District.
Keep smiling because the light at the end of someone's tunnel may be you, Ron Cheneler

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Re: What can we celebrate today?

Post by AAAlphaThunder » Sun Aug 02, 2020 7:37 am

blythburgh wrote:
Sun Aug 02, 2020 7:26 am
AAAlphaThunder wrote:
Sat Aug 01, 2020 2:22 pm
[2016] The Yorkshire Dales National Park was extended by nearly a quarter (161 square miles were added), covering new areas in Cumbria and into Lancashire.

It's beautiful, an ideal staycation.
Absolutely but does the National Park need a new name? The Lake District can be so popular but the Yorkshire Dales are less popular but stunning. As is the Peak District.
What's in a name? That which we call a rose
By any other name would smell as sweet
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Richard Frost
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What can we celebrate today?

Post by Richard Frost » Sun Aug 02, 2020 9:28 am

2nd August

NATIONAL COLOURING BOOK DAY - https://nationaldaycalendar.com/nationa ... -august-2/
NATIONAL ICE CREAM SANDWICH DAY - https://nationaldaycalendar.com/nationa ... -august-2/
AMERICAN FAMILY DAY - https://nationaldaycalendar.com/america ... in-august/
NATIONAL FRIENDSHIP DAY - https://nationaldaycalendar.com/nationa ... in-august/
NATIONAL SISTERS DAY - https://nationaldaycalendar.com/nationa ... in-august/

On This Day in history - 2nd August

1100 King William II of England, (often known as William Rufus) son of William the Conqueror, was killed by an arrow while hunting in the New Forest after allegedly being mistaken for a deer. A stone known as the 'Rufus Stone', close to the A31 near the village of Minstead is claimed to mark the spot where William II was killed. William Rufus also built Brough Castle, in around 1092.

1610 English explorer Henry Hudson sailed into what is now known as Hudson Bay in north eastern Canada, thinking that he had made it through the Northwest Passage and reached the Pacific Ocean.

1776 The signing of the United States Declaration of Independence took place. On 4th July earlier that year the thirteen American colonies, then at war with Great Britain, regarded themselves as independent states, and no longer a part of the British Empire.

1784 The first specially-built Royal Mail coach began its scheduled service from Bristol to London.

1788 The death of Thomas Gainsborough, English portrait and landscape painter. He preferred landscapes to portraits, but painted King George III and his Queen, although the King was obliged to give the credit to Joshua Reynolds,Gainsborough's rival, as Reynolds was the royal painter.

1865 Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll was published but was soon withdrawn because of bad printing. Only 21 copies of the first edition survived, making it one of the rarest 19th century books. Lewis Carroll was born at Daresbury Parsonage in Cheshire (now in ruins and in the care of the National Trust - (see ©BB picture),

1870 Tower Subway opened in London. It is cited as the world's first underground 'tube' railway, though it was not the first underground railway. That was London's Metropolitan Railway which opened in 1863 and used a 'cut and cover' design to support the roof.

1894 Death duties, now known as inheritance tax, were introduced in Britain.

1895 The death (aged 37) of Joseph Thomson, Scottish geologist and African explorer. Thomson's Gazelle and Thomson's Falls (Kenya) are named after him. His motto was 'He who goes gently, goes safely; he who goes safely, goes far.' There is a monument to Thomson in Thornhill, Dumfriesshire, two miles from Penpont village where he was born.

1922 The death of Alexander Graham Bell, the Scottish scientist who is credited with inventing the first practical telephone.

1925 Alan Whicker, broadcaster and writer was born.

1957 The official Elvis Presley Fan Club was launched in the UK.

1970 The British army used rubber bullets for the first time to quell a riot in Northern Ireland.

1973 51 people were killed when fire swept through the Summerland Amusement Centre at Douglas on the Isle of Man. It was one of the worst British peacetime disasters involving a fire since 1929 when the Glen Cinema in Paisley, Scotland caught fire. It killed 69 children and injured 40 others.

1989 Trade restrictions between Britain and Argentina were lifted for the first time since the 1982 Falklands war.

1993 Following speculative pressure on currencies in the European Exchange Rate Mechanism, the Mechanism collapsed and currencies were allowed to fluctuate within broad band of 15% on either side of central rates.

2013 Magdelena Luczak, 27, and Mariusz Krezolek, 34, from Coventry were served a minimum of 30 years each for what the judge called their 'incomprehensible brutality' that led to the death, from a head injury, of her 4 year old son Daniel. Daniel, who had also been starved by the pair and was subjected to cold water punishment weighed just over a stone and a half when he died and had 'endured severe physical and mental suffering'.

2014 49 year old Stuart Kettell completed his challenge to push a Brussels sprout up Snowdon using his nose. It took him 3 days and he raised more than £6000 for Macmillan Cancer Support.

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Re: What can we celebrate today?

Post by AAAlphaThunder » Sun Aug 02, 2020 9:49 am

[1957] The official Elvis Presley Fan Club was launched in the UK.

The king is alive.
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Re: What can we celebrate today?

Post by Richard Frost » Sun Aug 02, 2020 12:01 pm

AAAlphaThunder wrote:
Sun Aug 02, 2020 9:49 am
[1957] The official Elvis Presley Fan Club was launched in the UK.

The king is alive.
Now I really do know you espouse rubbish https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elvis_Presley

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What can we celebrate today?

Post by Richard Frost » Mon Aug 03, 2020 10:03 am

3rd August 2020

NATIONAL GEORGIA DAY - https://nationaldaycalendar.com/nationa ... -august-3/
NATIONAL GRAB SOME NUTS DAY - https://nationaldaycalendar.com/nationa ... y-august-3
NATIONAL WATERMELON DAY - https://nationaldaycalendar.com/nationa ... -august-3/

On This Day in history - 3rd August

1326 The death, in the Tower of London, of Roger Mortimer de Chirk, opposer of Edward II during the Despenser War. His nephew Roger Mortimer later led a successful rebellion against the King and completed Chirk Castle.

1460 James II, King of Scotland, died after being injured by an exploding cannon at Kelso, in the Scottish Borders. Kelso Abbey was the venue for the hasty coronation of the infant king, James III, which quickly followed.

1492 Christopher Columbus sets sail from Palos de la Frontera in Spain, intending to reach India. Instead, he would arrive on Guanahani, an island in the Bahamas, making landfall on 12 October.

1692 The birth of John Henley, English clergyman. He was known as 'Orator Henley' for his showmanship and eccentricity. He charged people the sum of one shilling to attend his meetings because the seats were his personal property!

1792 The death, at Cromford, of Richard Arkwright, one of the central figures of the Industrial Revolution and founder of the factory system that transformed England into the workshop of the world.

1803 The birth of Joseph Paxton, English gardener, designer, writer and creator of one of the most famous buildings of Queen Victoria's reign, the Crystal Palace.

1805 The first recorded cricket match between English public schools Eton and Harrow.

1856 London was divided into postal districts, in order to speed up letter deliveries.

1858 Lake Victoria, the source of the Nile, was discovered by the explorer John Speke.

1867 The birth of Stanley Baldwin, Prime Minister from 1923-29. This term of office saw the General Strike of 1926, and during his third term, (1935-7), Edward VIII abdicated.

1887 The birth of Rupert Brooke, the English poet known for his idealistic war sonnets written during the First World War, especially ' The Soldier' that begins 'If I should die, think only this of me: That there's some corner of a foreign field That is forever England.'

1908 The Post Office sent its first parcel mail to the US on the White Star liner, Teutonic

1916 Sir Roger Casement, Irish nationalist, was hanged in London for treason, following his attempts to induce Germany to support the cause of Irish independence.

1926 Britain installed its first traffic lights - at Piccadilly Circus, in London.

1946 The birth of Jack Straw former Home Secretary, Foreign Secretary and MP for Blackburn since 1979.

1957 Footballer John Charles was transferred from Leeds to Juventus for a £65,000 fee. He was the first British footballer to be transferred to a foreign club.

1963 The Beatles performed at The Cavern Club (on 10, Mathew Street, Liverpool), for the 292nd, and last time. They received a fee of £300 pounds for the performance.

1971 Sanquhar Post Office in Dumfries and Galloway became a Category B Listed Building. It is recognised by the Guinness Book of World Records as the oldest post office in the world and has been in continuous service since 1712.

1978 The Queen officially opened the 11th Commonwealth Games in Edmonton, Canada.

2001 A bomb exploded in a busy west London street, injuring seven people. Dissident Irish republicans were blamed for the atrocity.

2002 The death of Carmen Silvera, Canadian-born British comic actress who starred in the television programme, 'Allo Allo!' (written by David Croft & Jeremy Lloyd) as Edith Artois, wife of the cafe owner René.

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What can we celebrate today?

Post by Richard Frost » Tue Aug 04, 2020 10:09 am

August 4th

NATIONAL CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIE DAY
NATIONAL NIGHT OUT DAY

On This Day in history - 4th August

1265 The Battle of Evesham (Worcestershire) took place, in which the army of Prince Edward, the future king Edward I of England, defeated the forces of rebellious barons led by Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester. De Montfort and many of his allies were killed.

1704 Gibraltar was captured for the British by Admiral Sir George Rooke.

1792 The birth of Percy Shelley, one of the major English Romantic poets. In September 1812 Shelley, pursued by debtors and authorities who wished to question the poet about his radical political activities fled to Tremadog and lived at at Tan-yr-allt the former home of William Madocks, the designer and builder of most of Tremadog.

1870 The British Red Cross Society was founded, by Lord Wantage.

1914 Britain declared war on Germany after the Germans had violated the Treaty of London by invading Belgium, and so began 'the war to end all wars'. The United States declared their neutrality.

1917 Captain Noel Chavasse, of the Royal Army Medical Corps, only the second man to be awarded the additional bar to the Victorian Cross for bravery, died from injuries sustained in battle four days earlier.

1923 The BBC began using the 'pips' as a time signal in its broadcasts.

1954 Britain's first supersonic fighter plane, the English Electric Lightning P-1, made its maiden flight.

1972 President Idi Amin declared that Uganda would expel 50,000 Asians with British passports to Britain within three months.

1985 The death of Don Whillans rock climber and mountaineer who climbed with both Joe Brown and Chris Bonington on many new routes, and was considered the technical equal of both. The British Mountaineering Council maintain a climbing hut near the Roaches, Staffordshire, in his memory.

1987 Moors murderer Ian Brady claimed that he was involved in another five killings.

1989 'Licence to Kill' went on general cinema release in the United Kingdom. It was the sixteenth entry in the James Bond film series by Eon Productions, and the first one not to use the title of an Ian Fleming novel.

2000 Celebrations took place all over the United Kingdom to mark the 100th birthday of Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother. She was the first ever member of the Royal Family to reach her centenary.

2002 Police in Soham, Cambridgeshire were 'extremely concerned' over the disappearance of two 10-year-old schoolgirls Holly Wells and Jessica Chapman. Their school caretaker Ian Huntley was later found guilty of their murder.

2005 Osama Bin Laden's lieutenant Ayman al-Zawahri warned that London would face more attacks because of Tony Blair's foreign policy decisions. The al-Qaeda deputy said: "Blair has brought you destruction to the heart of London, and he will bring more destruction, God willing."

2012 The annual stinging nettle-eating competition, started in 1986, was held at The Bottle Inn pub at Marshwood near Bridport in Dorset. The current record at the event for the most amount of nettles eaten in one hour is 76ft (23m).

2012 Great Britain enjoyed its most successful day at an Olympics in 104 years by winning six gold medals on day eight of the London Games.

2014 People in the UK were encouraged to turn off their lights between 10pm and 11pm, leaving only a single light or candle for a symbolic act of reflection and hope in commemoration of the 100th anniversary of World War 1. On the eve of Britain officially entering the war, Sir Edward Grey, the Foreign Secretary, uttered the words "The lamps are going out all over Europe, we shall not see them lit again in our lifetime."

blythburgh
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Re: What can we celebrate today?

Post by blythburgh » Wed Aug 05, 2020 7:56 am

Richard Frost wrote:
Sun Aug 02, 2020 12:01 pm
AAAlphaThunder wrote:
Sun Aug 02, 2020 9:49 am
[1957] The official Elvis Presley Fan Club was launched in the UK.

The king is alive.
Now I really do know you espouse rubbish https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elvis_Presley
He will live as long as people appreciate his music. In the same way as you will live after your death as long as people remember you.
Keep smiling because the light at the end of someone's tunnel may be you, Ron Cheneler

blythburgh
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Re: What can we celebrate today?

Post by blythburgh » Wed Aug 05, 2020 8:00 am

2002 Police in Soham, Cambridgeshire were 'extremely concerned' over the disappearance of two 10-year-old schoolgirls Holly Wells and Jessica Chapman. Their school caretaker Ian Huntley was later found guilty of their murder.

And the killer's girlfriend is still spoken in the same breath as Myra Hyndley. Never understood why though. One was a cold blooded murderer and one provided an alibi for the killer. How many men and women have been so fooled by the one they loved they gave a false alibi? Not saying she did not commit a criminal offence that needed punishment just saying she should not be villified the way she is.
Keep smiling because the light at the end of someone's tunnel may be you, Ron Cheneler

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